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20110731
20110731
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
to be liked rather than respected. they have wound up being need that. >> the war in iraq and afghanistan, what would you do? >> help the iraqi security forces to govern that country. in afghanistan, we have to walk -- have to watch out for a precipitous withdrawal. it would create a new harbor for terrorism and they would lose their ability to stabilize the government. >> have you met world leaders? what has been your impression of them? >> i do not believe that is important. i look at the strategic interest of the united states and our allies and how we can mutually cooperate and mutually conflicts. >> finish this sentence. the state of the country today is what? >> an opportunity to be seized. big government and big banks have failed us. the crushing weight of the potential markets have yet to be fixed. that has helped to inhibit the ability of the american people to move forward. it is never a failure of the american people. that is not why we are having the difficulties we are having. it is the failure of governments to affect the larger institutions. for a period of time, you are ab
had "rambo" in afghanistan, you have a war in the afghanistan and a lot of the way we describe it is about the rambos in afghanistan. obviously, gordon gekko becomes bernie madoff and all the ripoff artist on wall street. the evil guy from "tron," i'm only have joke here, kind of is mark zuckerberg. [laughter] the a-team, the idea of the private contractor you have to hire to fix your problems for you is kind of, in some ways, blackwater or at least our reliance on private contractors and how we think about private contractors. and the evil guy, cobra, in "g.i. joe," was a very clear allusion to islamic fundamentalist terrorism. what i argue in the book is that these images, these stories became powerful in the 1990 and -- 1980s and enduring because of certain structural changes that were happening in our economy. and i told nathan by e-mail that i was going to do this. i stole and used one of the cover graphics of nathan's book to sort of highlight how this happened. but an argument in this book is that things change in the 1980s in a way that made the storylines and the icono
and the war in afghanistan? >> we will continue to help govern so they have a legitimate chance to continue hold on to their liberty. you have to look at in afghanistan is we have to watch out for a precipitous withdrawal, which would allow the taliban to come back and continue to create a new harbor for terrorism and to use their ability to destabilize the government of pakistan. >> have you met world leaders? what is your impression of them? >> i have that world leaders, and i do not worry about what i think of them. i do not believe that that is what is important. i look at the strategic interests of the united states and our allies and how this nation can either mutually cooperate or mutually conflict. >> finish the sentence -- "the state of the country today is what?" >> an opportunity waiting to be seized. >> why has it not been seized? because a lot of institutions such as the government and big banks have failed us, and i think the crushing weight of the government and the crushing weight of the failure of the financial markets have had -- have helped to inhibit the american people
to report to the american people exactly how this is going to happen. >> chairman mullen is in afghanistan. he told our troops fighting there he didn't know the answer to when and where they would get paid. will the president insist that if there's a default, the troops will get paid? >> again, the treasury department -- by the way, whatever admiral mullen talked about, it's outrageous that here we are, 60 hours away from the united states of america potentially defaulting for the first time. and the reason we're here is that, particularly republicans in the house, but republicans generally had been unwilling to compromise. so, at the appropriate point, if we get to that point, the treasury department will lay out clearly for the american people, most importantly for investors, folks around the world, exactly what would happen if we default. >> i want to be clear on what the president would accept in terms of cuts, in the first stage or the second stage. in other words, that what's called in washington a trigger, which means that whatever force's congress's hand, if they don't continue to
have had their fill of catastrophe and near catastrophe. recently in afghanistan, admiral mullen, chairman of our joint chiefs, was asked by troops if they'll be paid next month. his answer was, "i honestly can't answer that question." admiral mullen had to tell the troops, "i'd like to give you a better answer than that right now. i just honestly don't know." mr. president, it is inconceivable to me that we will leave our troops in limbo by driving our country over the cliff of default. our nation's economic life is in peril. i don't remember ever in the 32 years that i've been here is our nation more in need of deliberation, statesmanship and compromise. "the new york times" columnist david brooks, who is a conservative columnist, recently wrote that too many republicans seem to have joined a movement -- his word -- in which -- quote -- "the members do not accept the logic of compromise, no matter what the terms." close quote. i hope that some of our republican colleagues will prove mr. brooks wrong on this matter because of its huge significance. the time for ignoring hard tru
with a situation like 9/11 or the war in iraq or afghanistan are terrorism? what if there is unforeseen event that would force government to spend more money than it takes an? guest: the legislation would have to be written to be including situations when we get like that. i am no expert on the u.s. economy so i want to put that disclaimer out there right now. but we are spending more than we're taking in and it is not sustainable. we cannot continue down this path. when you have the medicare board of trustees coming out in the month of may and releasing a report that says, if medicare is not reformed in 2024, it will be bankrupt, it is irresponsible for washington not to do anything about their when you know you are facing this problem. we need to deal with that. we need to do some entitlement reform across the board. we cannot balance the u.s. budget by cutting discretionary spending. host: i realize that this is still coming together so the information continues to evolve. but based on what we hear this morning, it is a $1.4 trillion increase in the debt limit immediately. based on misinfo
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)

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